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On Demand Recording Library

Sponsored by Chevron

 
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On Demand Library Sponsors

Thank you to Chevron, our on demand library sponsor for supporting the SPE Calgary Section. With this video library we have the ability to bring unparalleled insights, shared expertise, life-long learning and community strength to fuel the success of our members and the future of the industry.

 
The Finance You Need to Know (Video Library)
42:19

The Finance You Need to Know (Video Library)

SPE MEMBERS CAN ACCESS THIS WEBINAR FOR FREE. EMAIL calgarysection@spe.org WITH YOUR SPE MEMBERSHIP NUMBER, AND YOU WILL BE SENT A FREE RECORDING. NON-MEMBERS: $10 ABSTRACT: This webinar is created for Students interested in taking control of their finances. There is a lot of noise about what you should be doing with your money and how you should be investing it. Rather than trying to be convinced, how about learning to make decisions for yourself that make sense to you? That is the goal of the personal-finance workshop being run by Zachary Kahn. It will cover the following topics: Techniques to track your investment behaviour to constantly make better decisions (thank billionaire Ray Dalio for this). Best tools for tracking and minimizing your expenses (reduce your expenses by 10+% per month). Visual examples (with free templates to download) of how minimizing your expenses used with investing can grow your wealth exponentially over long periods. The registered accounts you could be maximizing now to make more with the money you invest (Hint: TFSA, RRSP can save you thousands of dollars per year). Of course, this is not everything you need to know, but it’s a jump start to provide you with new information (or perhaps is a nice reminder) of what you can do now to make sure you set yourself up for the life you want. Speaker Bio: Zachary Kahn, is a recent graduate of U of C, where he completed a combined degree in Chemical Engineering and Computer Science. He completed the internship program and worked in the Canadian energy industry at a major E&P and in the North American tech industry. Upon graduation, he was recruited by Google as a new graduate Software Engineer. Zack has a passion for helping people understand the mechanisms to establish financial independence by doing what they love. He is the co-founder of Compound Confidence, which is an education platform that helps people grow their skills and confidence to become financially free.
Session 1 of Finding the Groove - Session 1 - Transitioning to a Home Office (Video Library)
44:46

Session 1 of Finding the Groove - Session 1 - Transitioning to a Home Office (Video Library)

ABSTRACT: This is the first session of a three part series to help you transition to working from home. The current circumstances have displaced people. It’s jarring. It’s uncomfortable. It’s never going to be the same. This series has been designed for our community to share our tricks and techniques for finding our groove and maintaining a productive approach to our work. We find ourselves transitioning to remote working, dealing with a major economic downturn, and facing a historically low price of oil. First webinar – Transitioning to a Home Office Join us on a quick talk on the challenge of setting up a home office and share what you found successful in establishing a productive space. Top Tricks for Physical Workspace: - Making your own space productive - Hardware considerations (wifi, wired, hubs and docking stations, webcams and microphones) Top Tricks for using Collaborative Technology: - Survey of available technology - Best practices for shared/group sessions Speaker Bio: Kirk Graham, Kirk brings over 20 years of experience in project, program, and portfolio management. He enjoys working with clients and partners to bring fulsome solutions that improve the bottom line. He has extensive experience bringing geographically dispersed teams together to help companies define a problem they can solve and assists in crafting and implementing a solution to create a measurable business impact.
Unlocking Light and Tight Oil: Exploring Its Past, Present, & Future (Video Library)
01:23:35

Unlocking Light and Tight Oil: Exploring Its Past, Present, & Future (Video Library)

SPE MEMBERS CAN ACCESS THIS WEBINAR FOR FREE. EMAIL calgarysection@spe.org WITH YOUR SPE MEMBERSHIP NUMBER, AND YOU WILL BE SENT A FREE RECORDING. NON-MEMBERS: $10 ABSTRACT: Light and tight oil production in North America has increased dramatically since 2005, mainly due to the advancements in horizontal drilling and multi-stage fracking technologies. Production from tight reservoirs now constitutes a significant part of the overall oil production in the U.S. and Canada. However, production declines rapidly from usually a high initial rate for newly drilled wells, and primary recovery factors usually do not exceed 5 to 15 per cent of the initial oil in place. This is mostly due to the low permeability of the formations and reduction in fracture conductivity over time. Overall production is sustained through an active drilling program, which is becoming more difficult to maintain as we move into the lower quality parts of tight oil reservoirs. In this webinar, we will discuss the future of light oil production and review the promising technologies that have the potential to slow down the initial production decline and improve the recovery factors from tight oil formations. Retaining the fracture conductivity post fracking is an important factor for improved recovery from fracked wells. We will discuss a workflow for optimizing frack parameters for each well, both for primary production and for subsequent enhanced oil recovery applications. We will then review various enhanced oil recovery techniques and their potential in tight oil formations. Speaker Bios: Petro Nakutnyy, manages the Saskatchewan Research Council’s (SRC) Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) Processes Business Unit. His major technical responsibility is to conduct applied research and development of EOR processes and laboratory engineering design for the petroleum and in-situ mining projects. Petro’s team encompasses nearly three decades of experience and expertise in gas and chemical in-situ recovery solutions. Petro holds a Master of Applied Science degree in petroleum engineering and is a registered professional engineer with the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan. Behrooz K-Hosseini, PhD, is a Senior Reservoir Engineer, EOR Processes, in the Energy Division at SRC. He has an undergraduate degree in Petroleum Engineering and a Master of Science in Reservoir Engineering and hydrodynamics from, National Polytechnic Institute of Lorraine (School of Geology) in France as an international merit TOTAL E&P scholar where he was founder and president of SPE chapter in University of Lorraine. Behrooz is a registered professional engineer and holds a PhD with specialization in Petroleum Geomechanics from the University of Alberta. He has worked in different areas related to petroleum & reservoir geomechanics, reservoir simulation, numerical code development and EOR processes.
How to Design Successful Heavy Oil & Bitumen Recovery Processes: Important Considerations (Video Library)
01:14:33

How to Design Successful Heavy Oil & Bitumen Recovery Processes: Important Considerations (Video Library)

SPE MEMBERS CAN ACCESS THIS WEBINAR FOR FREE. EMAIL calgarysection@spe.org WITH YOUR SPE MEMBERSHIP NUMBER, AND YOU WILL BE SENT A FREE RECORDING. NON-MEMBERS: $10 ABSTRACT: The heavy oil and bitumen industry has gone through an important transformation in recent years, driven by a sustained period of low oil prices, heightened environmental pressures and declining production from conventional assets. Innovation is more important than ever as we search for new ideas and processes that are desperately needed to reduce the costs and carbon footprint of oil extraction. Traditionally, new processes can take more than 20 years from conception to commercial application. Today, we need to be able to compress the innovation cycle to three years or less. In this presentation, we will discuss important considerations for designing and optimizing novel heavy oil and bitumen recovery processes, including chemical, solvent, thermal and hybrid processes. We will focus on large-scale physical modelling and numerical simulation, as well as share several examples of how using comprehensive scaled 3-D models has helped oil companies prevent costly mistakes in the field, saving many years of process development and testing. We’ll also discuss aspects of process implementation, including proper techniques for collecting and characterizing oilfield samples and field monitoring during pilot implementation. Muhammad Imran, PEng, PhD, is the Director of Operations for SRC’s Mining and Energy Division. He has led many projects, including innovative proofs of concept; development and optimization of medium and heavy oil EOR processes; lab-scale equipment design; and physical, fluid flow, and wormhole modelling. His major areas of expertise are vapour extraction (Vapex), solvent vapour extraction (SVX), thermal SVX (TSVX), heavy oil waterflooding, steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) and steam–surfactant processes. He has a track record of research success with multiple publications in journals and conference presentations. He has a PhD in Chemical Engineering from Ryerson University, Toronto.
QI for Engineers (Video Library)
42:24

QI for Engineers (Video Library)

SPE MEMBERS CAN ACCESS THIS WEBINAR FOR FREE. EMAIL calgarysection@spe.org WITH YOUR SPE MEMBERSHIP NUMBER, AND YOU WILL BE SENT A FREE RECORDING. NON-MEMBERS: $10 ABSTRACT: QI stands for Quantitative Interpretation, relating primarily to the analysis and interpretation of seismic data. From the perspective of an engineer, seismic data may seem remote and unfamiliar; maybe even irrelevant. However, it is a source of very detailed information about the reservoir that can contribute to a more complete understanding of reservoir properties and, ultimately, performance. We never know as much about the reservoir as we would like. Therefore models calibrated to data but generously coupled with conceptual understanding are necessary. This is the case regardless of the type of data or problem to be solved. The QI approach is in fact quite general and applies equally well to solving engineering problems as it does to seismic data problems. In both cases, we are extrapolating from the known to the unknown and making decisions based on these inferences. QI can be a mysterious process even to geophysicists. It involves sophisticated geophysical operations and multiple boot-strapped steps in a complex workflow. However, the integration of the deliverables of QI is the objective of this discussion. Let’s assume that the sophisticated geophysical operations have already been done by sophisticated geophysicists and that the team has confidence that the analysis process has been completed thoroughly and correctly. Unfortunately, though, that is where the integration stops for many; with multiple seismic volumes representing months of work, sitting in a drawer. The main reason for that disconnect is a lack of understanding on both sides of what the seismic analysis represents, what it doesn’t represent, and how to use it with confidence in an integrated model of the reservoir. I intend to explain the QI method in general terms, how it is applied to seismic data, what the outputs mean and how they can complement other information about the reservoir from well and production knowledge. At the same time, the QI method itself can be applied to reservoir management. The combination of the additional detail from seismic data and, in turn, refocusing the method will give engineers new insights and new tools to make better decisions based on superior understanding of the reservoir. Speaker Bio: Over her 30 year career as a geophysicist, Laurie Weston has seen the oil and gas industries from many perspectives. She has been part of the evolution of exploration objectives and analysis techniques, both as a scientist and an entrepreneur. Laurie’s career began with Shell Canada in Calgary doing seismic processing and interpretation in the central plains area of Alberta. Looking for adventure and travel, she took a position with LASMO plc in London, to work on various European, North African and Middle East projects. Upon her return to Canada, Laurie consulted with Nexen Canada Inc. before founding her own seismic consulting company in 2007. The company, called Oil Sands Imaging, was later re-branded as Sound QI and sold to Canadian Discovery in 2012. In early 2017, Laurie acquired the QI business from Canadian Discovery and re-started Sound QI.
Three Common Statistical Missteps We Make in Reservoir Characterization (Video Library)
58:10

Three Common Statistical Missteps We Make in Reservoir Characterization (Video Library)

SPE MEMBERS CAN ACCESS THIS WEBINAR FOR FREE. EMAIL calgarysection@spe.org WITH YOUR SPE MEMBERSHIP NUMBER, AND YOU WILL BE SENT A FREE RECORDING. NON-MEMBERS: $10 ABSTRACT: Reservoir characterization analysis resulting from incorrect applications of statistics can be found in the literature, particularly in applications where integration of various disciplines is needed. Here, we look at three misapplications of ordinary least squares linear regression (LSLR) and show how they can lead to poor results and offer better alternatives, where available. The issues are Application of algebra to an LSLR-derived model to reverse the roles of explanatory and response variables that may give biased predictions. In particular, we examine pore throat size equations (e.g., Winland’s and Pittman’s equations) and find that claims of over-predicted permeability may in part be due to statistical mistakes. Using a log-transformed variable in an LSLR model, de-transforming without accounting for the role of noise gives an equation which under-predicts the mean value. Several approaches exist to address this problem. Mis-application of R2 in three cases that lead to misleading results. For example, model fitting in decline curve analysis gives optimistic R2 values, as is also the case where a multimodal explanatory variable is present. Using actual and synthetic datasets, we illustrate the effects that these errors have on analysis and some implications for using machine learning results. Speaker Bio: Dr. Jerry Jensen is a part-time research engineer at the Bureau of Economic Geology, University of Texas at Austin. From 2007 to 2018, he held the Schulich Chair in Geostatistics at the University of Calgary’s Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering. Prior to 2007, Dr. Jensen held faculty positions at Texas A&M (1998-2007) and Heriot-Watt (1985-1997) Universities and worked as a field engineer for Services Techniques Schlumberger (1973-1977) and Gearhart Industries (1977-1983). Dr. Jensen received a BSc in electrical engineering from the U. of Birmingham (UK) in 1973 and a PhD degree in petroleum engineering from the U. of Texas at Austin in 1986. He is author or co-author of over 100 publications, including the books “Statistics for Petroleum Engineers and Geoscientists” (2000) and “Applied Reservoir Characterization (2014), both by Elsevier. He has research and teaching interests in inter-well connectivity, petrophysical analysis of unconventional reservoirs, and strategic sampling for reservoir analysis and modeling. He was also an SPE distinguished lecturer in 2011-2012 on the topic of inter-well connectivity.